Visiting Art in Bloom 2017 at MIA

Using muted colors (except for those stunning lavender roses), the MSHS arrangement reflects the melancholy feeling of “Rouen Cathedral, Sunrise.” It’s the 13th year MSHS has participated in Art in Bloom.

The annual Art in Bloom exhibit is on display today and through the weekend at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and MSHS is participating again with an interpretation of “Rouen Cathedral, Sunrise,” a painting by Richard Parkes Bonington. It was the 13th year MSHS created a display for Art in Bloom, and this year the floral artists were our own marketing and editorial coordinator Brenda Harvieux and her husband Brian Eggert.

Sponsored by the Friends of the Institute for 34 years, Art in Bloom is an annual event in the Twin Cities. This year, 165 florists and artists interpreted works of art from the museum’s collections in flowers. The event is free and open to the public, and judging by the crowds on Thursday afternoon, it is much beloved and popular. The interpretations are fascinating to see. Some are literal, repeating colors, shapes and spatial relationships from the painting or sculpture. Others are minimalist—a vase and a few flowers to reflect the art work. The floral arrangements seem to interact with the paintings and sculptures in unique ways.

Below are photos of a few of the floral arrangements.

This interpretation by first-year participant Daniel Dobrow of “Three Women,” by Ferdinand Leger absolutely captures the painting using only a few flowers.

This arrangement in response to “The Journey of the Magi,” by James Tissot was created by Jessica Leopold of Koehler & Dramm. Can you pick out the three kings?

It seemed to me that the religious art was more of a challenge to interpret in flowers than some of the secular works. But Terry Carter, a 17-year-participant in the show, captured Benedetto di Bindo Zoppo’s portrait of St. Lucy with just a few gladioli.

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